5 Ways to Improve your Study Habits

#1 – Regarding your Learning Style – Slow it Down and Try New Things

Learning is built slowly, and so is the ability to sustain studying practices. When studying practices are slow and deliberate, working knowledge is more securely stored in memory. When they’re fast, there’s less steady learning, thus less to commit to memory. To have more effective study sessions, review all material the day it is initially covered in class. This helps to build foundational knowledge and prevents the “curve of forgetting” from ever being an issue. And finally, whether it is a podcast, an online video, or a related or cited scholarly article from your initial reading – it behooves you to expand focus and…

 

#2 – Like a Lawyer, Discovery can Fortify your Understanding on the Subject 

During any pre-trial proceedings, there is a process known as discovery. This is where both sides are granted equal access to all facts and evidence related to the case. Similar to studying, it is incredibly helpful to expand your research to include not only your primary topic, but the topics that are also related. This associative learning provides useful detail and context that might not otherwise be gained if siloed to your single subject. Avoid cramming all this information, and be sure to…

 

#3 – Schedule your Study for Maximum Benefit (and Remember to Take Breaks!)

Studying for long amounts of time and cramming are not helpful for fact retention, and certainly don’t lead to building the strong foundational knowledge we mentioned in #1. Using the Pomodoro Technique is a simple way to best utilize your time and maintain a strong retention of the material you are covering. Related, and it should go without writing, but distractions can defeat any study practices, so…

 

#4 – Turn off Notifications, and Put the Phone Down

As our society becomes more accustomed to having technology ever-present and ready at our beck and call – we still need to place limits and moderate its use. While studying, and especially if using a good old paper-bound or hardcover book, make sure that you are focusing on the material and not being called away by that tweet, follow, like, or snap. If you are using technology like a laptop, tablet, or computer to study – again, stay focused and limit yourself to only being social while on break. Understand that…

 

#5 – Talking to Other Students about the Material Covered may be a Great Help

If you’re able – getting into study groups (so long as they are productive) may be a great resource to learn more about foundational ideas, while providing experiences that will assist in broadening your understanding of a subject. It should be helpful in the sense that others may have a stronger or weaker grasp of the material, and that others share similar struggles. This will help you gain insight on where to focus more attention when studying alone.

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